Tech Ramblings

Where I ponder technology mixed with a bit of politics, policy, and digital marketing.
fastcompany:

A new website from a couple MIT grads lets customers haggle for high-end, locally made products.
Haggling is an age-old tradition at marketplaces around the world, but price negotiations between merchants and buyers haven’t quite made their way into the world of e-commerce.
Theorem, a San Francisco-based startup headed by MIT grads Ryan Jackson and Adam Roberts, is trying to change that.
Read More>

fastcompany:

A new website from a couple MIT grads lets customers haggle for high-end, locally made products.

Haggling is an age-old tradition at marketplaces around the world, but price negotiations between merchants and buyers haven’t quite made their way into the world of e-commerce.

Theorem, a San Francisco-based startup headed by MIT grads Ryan Jackson and Adam Roberts, is trying to change that.

Read More>

fastcompany:

In 1977, the company introduced a pioneering, unsuccessful — and eventually legendary — high-tech timepiece.
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fastcompany:

In 1977, the company introduced a pioneering, unsuccessful — and eventually legendary — high-tech timepiece.

Read More>

fastcompany:

Do your Internet habits hold you back, or help you succeed?
In theory, technology should increase both work flexibility and productivity, but it is also responsible for procrastination and a major threat to people’s work-life balance.
In fact, much of the recent debate about work-life imbalance is concerned with our relationship with technology, in particular our inability to disconnect or go offline.
For example, in the U.S. almost 50% of working adults report being “hooked” on email, which is estimated to cost the nation’s economy at least $900 billion a year in productivity loss. According to consulting firm McKinsey & Company, professionals spend 28% of their work time reading or answering emails. These statistics explain the international success of bestselling books like The Four Hour Work Week.
Furthermore, even people who manage to keep their email addiction in check are prone to getting hooked on other sites or apps, such as Facebook or Twitter, with a growing number of people trying social media sabbatical, where they detox from these sites for a couple of months or so. Needless to say, our digital excesses may harm not just our productivity but also our personal relationships with others, especially if they demand exclusive attention from the physical world.
So how can we better manage our web-life balance? Here are four practical suggestions you may want to consider:
Read More>

fastcompany:

Do your Internet habits hold you back, or help you succeed?

In theory, technology should increase both work flexibility and productivity, but it is also responsible for procrastination and a major threat to people’s work-life balance.

In fact, much of the recent debate about work-life imbalance is concerned with our relationship with technology, in particular our inability to disconnect or go offline.

For example, in the U.S. almost 50% of working adults report being “hooked” on email, which is estimated to cost the nation’s economy at least $900 billion a year in productivity loss. According to consulting firm McKinsey & Company, professionals spend 28% of their work time reading or answering emails. These statistics explain the international success of bestselling books like The Four Hour Work Week.

Furthermore, even people who manage to keep their email addiction in check are prone to getting hooked on other sites or apps, such as Facebook or Twitter, with a growing number of people trying social media sabbatical, where they detox from these sites for a couple of months or so. Needless to say, our digital excesses may harm not just our productivity but also our personal relationships with others, especially if they demand exclusive attention from the physical world.

So how can we better manage our web-life balance? Here are four practical suggestions you may want to consider:

Read More>

Donner Lake!

Donner Lake!

fastcompany:

Immigration reform is a hot-button topic, one that’s complicated, far-reaching, and divisive. Unfortunately, the conversation about immigration often gets rendered down to a simplistic “us and them” continuum. But pulling back focus on the topic reminds us that almost all Americans are descended from immigrants; that in its early days, the country was built by the dreams and hard work of people who came from somewhere else.
A new campaign from Welcome.us—a new nonprofit organization dedicated to celebrating U.S. immigration—aims to change the dialogue around immigration by placing attention on the country’s diverse immigrant heritage. The campaign is intended to support and raise awareness for the inaugural Immigration Heritage Month this June, which was initiated by Welcome.us and is now officially recognized by the U.S. House of Representatives.
The campaign’s national spot, “Welcome.us” celebrates the diversity of immigrant heritages across America.
Watch>

fastcompany:

Immigration reform is a hot-button topic, one that’s complicated, far-reaching, and divisive. Unfortunately, the conversation about immigration often gets rendered down to a simplistic “us and them” continuum. But pulling back focus on the topic reminds us that almost all Americans are descended from immigrants; that in its early days, the country was built by the dreams and hard work of people who came from somewhere else.

A new campaign from Welcome.us—a new nonprofit organization dedicated to celebrating U.S. immigration—aims to change the dialogue around immigration by placing attention on the country’s diverse immigrant heritage. The campaign is intended to support and raise awareness for the inaugural Immigration Heritage Month this June, which was initiated by Welcome.us and is now officially recognized by the U.S. House of Representatives.

The campaign’s national spot, “Welcome.us” celebrates the diversity of immigrant heritages across America.

Watch>

fastcompany:

Can These Eerie, Abandoned Grain Silos Help Save Buffalo?

Just south of downtown Buffalo, near the city’s First Ward, lies an area of abandoned grain elevators known as Silo City. They sit on the waterfront of Lake Erie like squat memories of Buffalo’s successful past. The silos are in a state of decay—but could they hold the keys to a more prosperous future for the city?

More> Fast Company

The 25 Year Old Analytical Mind

I have worked in a variety of industries and businesses over the past 20 years and something profound is happening as of late.  The twenty-something analytical wizard runs the show.  Due to their age, of course, they are kept in the background but that is going to be changing. In the case of the high tech industry it already has. 

Very few fifty something executives fully grasp this digital change in business.  Never in the history of our economy have executives had to have the vast digital skill sets needed to succeed.  In most cases, they camp out in the cube of the coding/analytical wizard in an attempt to get up to speed but most fall short.  In my experiences, many of these twenty somethings should be replacing these dinosaur executives.  Again, this is already happening in Silicon Valley and will slowly make its way into other old fashioned industries.  

For the most part, executives have no idea how to hire these wizards either.  How could they?  Their software experience is limited to Microsoft Word and Excel.  How would they know about Ruby, Python, HubSpot, Wordpress, Google Analytics, Black Hat SEO, Shopping cart integration, API’s, and so on and so on.   Guess who knows this stuff?   The under thirty club.   I am close to forty and have spent the last seven years getting up to speed on all of these technologies and by no means am I an expert.  No one is.  I can, at least, speak quite well to them.   The corporate board room better get with the Big Data program fast or we will replace them with the generation of change!

This is no thrash the older generation manifesto.  It is just an observation of many years and experiences.  The older generation can change but never in their lives have they seen anything of this magnitude.  In all honesty, I have experienced more change in the last five years of my life than probably twenty of my grandmothers.  Speed and change are the way of the business world now.  Today, it is get with the program or get out of the way.